February 15 Bible reading

14 02 2019

February 15  Psalm 22:1-11  Mark 1:1-28  Exodus 17; 18

Please read the suggested passages, prayerfully consider them, and the questions below. My comments here may be helpful after those moments. The suggested daily reading is for the purpose of reading through the whole Bible within a year.

Reading the Bible is helpful in taking next steps to follow Jesus. It may not be easy and yet it can be rewarding. Digging into Scripture alongside people you know is a life-giving way to pursue answers together. We discover the love that God has for us has been expressed through Jesus.

  • What’s the plain simple truth of the verses you read?
  • Based on today’s reading, what is one thing God is saying to you?
  • What should you do about that truth?

February 15  Psalm 22:1-11  Mark 1:1-28  Exodus 17; 18

Psalm 22:1-11  This is the Psalm that Jesus quotes from the cross. They sang this lament for crying out to God and not having heard an answer. And yet they sing His praises because He is worthy and because they remember that He rescued their ancestors. King David is overwhelmed by the violent challenges he faces. He will not be silent for a single night while calling for God to answer his prayer for help. David reminds God of how He rescued the Israelites in days gone by. What a contrast David sees between those days and his own! Despite this, he praises God describing a Creator who sits with those who praise Him. Distraught and calling for help, David chooses to trust God.

Mark 1:1-28  The “Gospel of Mark” was written by John Mark, cousin of Barnabas and faithful interpreter of the apostle Peter’s testimony. (Meaning he was the one who most often wrote down Peter’s sermons etc.) The early church viewed the book we now read, called “Mark”, as Peter’s memoirs. Mark traveled with Paul and Barnabas. His mother’s house was a gathering place for the early Jerusalem church and the place that the Lord’s Supper occurred. Jesus Christ is seen as the Son of God who became the Son of Man, our Messiah, and servant of Jehovah, who suffered for our ransom. This gospel seems to be written to people with a dominant Roman culture as the various Jewish customs are explained. There’s a clear focus on the “Good News” of Jesus. Jesus arrives, as predicted, He is baptized and God the Father speaks His love, approval, and joy over Him. Jesus calls people to believe and to repent of their sin. Jesus calls followers to become “fishers of men”.

Exodus 17; 18  Unprovoked, the army of Amalek attacked the Israelites. Using a team leadership effort, God helped them defeat the Amalekites. Moses’ father-in-law, Jethro, helped him understand team leadership. Moses delegated responsibilities of hearing complaints between offended parties (like small claims court). It’s important to note that Moses continued in his responsibility to intercede for the people. He prayed to God on their behalf. He spoke to the people on God’s behalf, communicating what God had said. Moses continued his responsibility to teach the Word of God. He continued to help them understand how to live out this faith in their daily lives. Moses utilized a team of leaders to ensure that the people would have someone available to them. This leadership team shared responsibility. This is a principle still relevant today. As Jesus taught His followers principles of prayer, “servant leadership”, and “mutual submission” they responded with team leadership, organization, delegation, and a lot of prayer. Praying for people, teaching God’s Word, and equipping people were core responsibilities that they carried.


Actions

Information

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.




%d bloggers like this: